Charles Margai asks president Bio to come clean on cost of commission of inquiry

Sierra Leone Telegraph: 8 October 2020:

Founder and leader of the People’s Movement for Democratic Change (PMDC) party in Sierra Leone – Charles Francis Margai, has written to president Julius Maada Bio – using the country’s Right to Access Information Act No. 2 of 2013 , asking the president to declare how much his government spent in conducting the Commission of Inquiry into the affairs of the former APC government, led by president Ernest Bai Koroma.

The letter comes as the debate about the hundreds of millions of dollars allegedly stolen or misused by the former government  – reported by the Commission of Inquiry, continues to make the news headlines.

Lawyer Charles Francis Margai is the first Attorney General appointed by President Bio in his first cabinet appointments after winning the 2018 elections , but was sacked by president Bio just weeks after his appointment.

In his letter, Charles Margai is asking the president to provide answers to the following questions:

1. how much money in total was spent on the C.O.I. exercise?

2. how much was spent on the salaries, allowances etc. of each commissioner?

3. how much fees were paid to counsel who represented the state?

4. how much was allocated to Administrative processes?

5. how much of the above was paid in foreign exchange/ local currency?

6. how much in terms of finances does the Government expect to recover from those found culpable?

According to the Right to Access Information Act No. 2 of 2013,  president Bio is by Law,  obliged to  respond to Charles Margai’s request for information.

If President Bio refuses to respond, he can be criminally prosecuted after leaving office and face criminal penalties including prison term of twelve months., as a sitting president cannot be prosecuted.

The Right to Access Information Act No. 2 of 2013, gives president Bio up to fifteen days to comply with Charles Margai’s  request for information.

 

4 Comments

  1. The six questions for president Bio, posed by the Attorney and leader of the PMDC party are fitting and proper. They are not too much to ask the president for an answer. The citizens, better still political stakeholders have the right to demand information and the president must respect the rights of the people, in whose interest the commissions were being carried, to inform the country without any delay regarding the total amount of greens the administration have had to spend in the exercises which lasted for nearly a year. It is a learning experience worthy of sharing, which, if need be, will serve future endeavors to follow in the full spirit of accountability and transparency. Come clean Mr. Pee.

  2. When my older brother from another mother.the “Illustrious” Mr Alimamy Turay
    speaks i have no other choice but to pay close attention and heed his prudent advice;I thank you for your kind encouraging words brother,and i give you my word today that i will not allow anything or anyone on this glorious forum to distract me from the task at hand – safeguarding the interests of our beloved nation as she struggles to unshackle herself from grips of authoritarian rule.
    Now is my finest moment to elevate my game to unreachable heights – Its time to restock and rearrange my stockpiles of cerebral arsenal..Its time to leave the petty stuff behind and reloaded my best analytical weapons in preparation for an all out WAR against totalitarianism in Sierra Leone.Word is bond!

  3. Mr L Colsen thanks for reminding everyone of us to stick to the facts. These are the facts. Our country is rich in mineral resources but have nothing to show for it. We rely on IMF loans and we can’t even produce our own staple food to be self sufficient. I can vouch the only time our country enjoyed a sense of nationhood as one people and heading in the right direction was under the short live leadership of Colonel Andrew Joxon – Smith military government in 1968. Maybe he was too good to be true. The good ones never last for long. Thomas Sankara comes to mind. Whilst the wicked and corrupt always managed to stay on for ever. During his time he succeed where most of both past and present leaders failed us as a nation.

    Colonel Andrew joxon Smith single-handedly froze tribal differences that have since cast a long dark shadow over our country. And these tribal and regional differences are all tied up with the chronic corruption our country has been subjected to over the last forty or fifty years. Corruption is so endemic and entrenched, within our societies, I will even go further to say its structural, cultural – both in our country and across many African countries. You will be forgiven to think we are blessed with natural and human resources but cursed with poor and greedy leadership.

    In all fairness, Corruption didn’t start with the EBK government, if anything as the commission reports showed it was amplified by those who can’t resist the urge to steal from the state. And if you think some of Bio’s Ministers are whiter than white – hold that thought and ask yourself what they have done to advance our country. Some of them are as guilty as the ones they are finger pointing. Bottom line, you cannot divorce our problems from the side effects of corruption. May God bless Sierra Leone

  4. Gentlemen, this is not about Mr Margai. It is about those in the previous administration of Mr Koroma who betrayed the people’s trust. Let’s stick to the subject, ok?

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