U.S. donates another batch of 502,200 COVID-19 vaccines to Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone Telegraph: 24 March 2022:

With the arrival of just over 500,000 new vaccines from the United States in Sierra Leone in March alone, the United States reached an important milestone of 500 million vaccines donated world-wide, according to a statement from the US embassy in Freetown.

The 200,000 Pfizer vaccines donated March 17 and the 302,200 Johnson & Johnson vaccines donated March 15 are part of the over 800,000 vaccines to donated to Sierra Leone by the United States since last year.

As of December 2021, the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for children in Sierra Leone as young as 12 years old.  To celebrate the latest vaccine arrivals, U.S. Deputy Chief of Mission Elaine French visited St. Joseph’s Secondary School in Freetown today to observe U.S. donated vaccines in action.

“COVID-19 vaccination is critical to preventing the spread of this disease and ending this pandemic.  Vaccination at schools like this will ensure that the people and youth of Sierra Leone are protected,” said Ms. French.

“We are grateful for our partnership with our other donor partners, the immunization program, and the Ministry of Health.  The increased vaccination coverage in the country is an example of how this partnership produces meaningful results,” she said.

Since COVID-19 vaccines have become available, the United States, in partnership with the Government of Sierra Leone, has worked to prevent COVID-19 infections.  Already 20% of Sierra Leoneans over the age of 12 are fully vaccinated.

United States vaccine donations and assistance will help Sierra Leone meet the ambitious WHO target of 70% vaccination by the end of 2022.

 

1 Comment

  1. Considering the history of The USA about how it related and still relates to black peoples, how unpolluted are these donated vaccines donated to Sierra Leone? Is anyone proof-testing “before” injections?

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